Survey of Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity among Neighborhoods in the Gulf (STRONG)

Consortium for Resilient Gulf Communities (CRGC)

DOI:
10.7266/N76971Z0
 
UDI:
R4.x266.199:0001
Last Update:
Jul 23 2018 06:49 UTC
 
Dataset Author(s):
Melissa Finucane, Matthew R. Lee, Rajeev Ramchand
Point of Contact:
Finucane, Melissa
RAND Corporation
4570 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania  15213
USA
finucane@rand.org
Funding Source:
RFP-IV
 
Extent Description:
Dataset contains survey data collected April through August 2016 from Gulf residents residing in 56 counties and parishes in close proximity to the Gulf of Mexico across five states: Louisiana, Texas, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi.

Identified Submitted In-Review Available
3 3 3 3

Suggested Citation:

Melissa Finucane, Matthew R. Lee, Rajeev Ramchand. 2018. Survey of Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity among Neighborhoods in the Gulf (STRONG). Distributed by: Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC), Harte Research Institute, Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi. doi:10.7266/N76971Z0

Abstract:

The purpose of the Survey of Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity among Neighborhoods in the Gulf (STRONG) was to assess the long term well-being of residents Gulf coast communities. Respondents were asked about dimensions of well-being including mental health, physical health, health care utilization, traumatic experiences, oil spill exposure, and alcohol use. Additional questions were asked about participation in local organizations, sources of information, employment, resource networks, risk perceptions, and demographics. STRONG collection entailed telephone interviews that occurred from April to August, 2016. The total sample comprised 2,520 respondents in 56 counties in five states (Louisiana, Texas, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi) within close proximity to the Gulf of Mexico.

Purpose:

To assess the long term well-being of residents of Gulf coast communities.

Theme Keywords:

Community, Resilience, Trauma, Health, Well-being

File Format:

csv, txt

Filename:

upload.zip (281.34 KB)

Dataset Downloads:

23

Survey of Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity among Neighborhoods in the Gulf (STRONG)



Identification Information
Distribution Information
Metadata Maintenance Information

Metadata: 
  File identifier: 
      R4.x266.199-0001-metadata.xml
  Language: 
      eng; USA
  Character set: 
    Character set code: 
      utf8
  Hierarchy level: 
    Scope code: 
      dataset
  Metadata author: 
    Responsible party: 
      Individual name: 
          Leah Drakeford
      Organisation name: 
          Louisiana State University / Department of Sociology
      Position name: 
          Graduate Student
      Contact info: 
        Contact: 
          Phone: 
            Telephone: 
              Voice: 
              Facsimile: 
          Address: 
            Address: 
              Delivery point: 
                  126 Stubbs Hall
              City: 
                  Baton Rouge
              Administrative area: 
                  Louisiana
              Postal code: 
                  70803
              Country: 
                  USA
              Electronic mail address: 
                  pdrake1@lsu.edu
      Role: 
        Role code: 
          pointOfContact
  Date stamp: 
      2018-08-11T13:55:06+00:00
  Metadata standard name: 
      ISO 19115-2 Geographic Information - Metadata - Part 2: Extensions for Imagery and Gridded Data
  Metadata standard version: 
      ISO 19115-2:2009(E)
  Dataset URI: 
      https://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org/metadata/R4.x266.199:0001
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Identification info: Data identification: Citation: Citation: Title: Survey of Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity among Neighborhoods in the Gulf (STRONG) Alternate title: Date: Date: Date: 2018-08-10 Date type: Date type code: publication Identifier: Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.7266/N76971Z0 title: DOI doi:10.7266/N76971Z0 Abstract: The purpose of the Survey of Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity among Neighborhoods in the Gulf (STRONG) was to assess the long term well-being of residents Gulf coast communities. Respondents were asked about dimensions of well-being including mental health, physical health, health care utilization, traumatic experiences, oil spill exposure, and alcohol use. Additional questions were asked about participation in local organizations, sources of information, employment, resource networks, risk perceptions, and demographics. STRONG collection entailed telephone interviews that occurred from April to August, 2016. The total sample comprised 2,520 respondents in 56 counties in five states (Louisiana, Texas, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi) within close proximity to the Gulf of Mexico. Purpose: To assess the long term well-being of residents of Gulf coast communities. Status: Progress code: completed Point of contact: Responsible party: Individual name: Melissa Finucane Organisation name: RAND Corporation Position name: Senior Scientist Contact info: Contact: Phone: Telephone: Voice: 4126832800 Facsimile: Address: Address: Delivery point: 4570 Fifth Avenue City: Pittsburgh Administrative area: Pennsylvania Postal code: 15213 Country: USA Electronic mail address: finucane@rand.org Role: Role code: pointOfContact Descriptive keywords: Keywords: Keyword: Community Keyword: Resilience Keyword: Trauma Keyword: Health Keyword: Well-being Type: Keyword type code: theme Descriptive keywords: Keywords: Keyword: inapplicable Type: Keyword type code: place Resource constraints: title: Cite As Constraints: Use limitation: Melissa Finucane, Matthew R. Lee, Rajeev Ramchand. 2018. Survey of Trauma, Resilience, and Opportunity among Neighborhoods in the Gulf (STRONG). Distributed by: Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC), Harte Research Institute, Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi. doi:10.7266/N76971Z0 Resource constraints: title: CC0 License Legal constraints: Use constraints: Restriction code: licenceUnrestricted Other constraints: This information is released under the Creative Commons license - No Rights Reserved - CC0 1.0 Universal (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/). The person who associated a work with this deed has dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law. You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission. Resource constraints: title: Liability and Warranty Legal constraints: Other constraints: All materials on this website are made available to GRIIDC and in turn to you "as-is." Content may only be submitted by an individual who represents and warrants that s/he has sufficient rights to be able to make the content available under a CC0 waiver. There is no warranty (expressed or implied) to these materials, their title, accuracy, non-infringement of third party rights, or fitness for any particular purpose, including the performance or results you may obtain from their use. Use these materials at your own risk. Under no circumstances shall GRIIDC be liable for any direct, incidental, special, consequential, indirect, or punitive damages that result from the use or the inability to use either this website or the materials available via this website. If you are dissatisfied with any website feature, content, or terms of use, your sole and exclusive remedy is to discontinue use. Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Ayer, L., Engel, C., Parker, A., Seelam, R., & Ramchand, R. (2018). Behavioral Health of Gulf Coast Residents 6 Years After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: The Role of Trauma History. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 1–7. doi:10.1017/dmp.2018.84 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2018.84 title: DOI doi:10.1017/dmp.2018.84 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Drakeford, L., Parks, V., Slack, T., Ramchand, R., Finucane, M., & Lee, M. R. (2019). Oil Spill Disruption and Problem Drinking: Assessing the Impact of Religious Context among Gulf Coast Residents. Population Research and Policy Review. doi:10.1007/s11113-019-09520-7 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11113-019-09520-7 title: DOI doi:10.1007/s11113-019-09520-7 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Parks, V., Slack, T., Ramchand, R., Drakeford, L., Finucane, M. L., & Lee, M. R. (2019). Fishing Households, Social Support, and Depression after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. Rural Sociology. doi:10.1111/ruso.12297 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ruso.12297 title: DOI doi:10.1111/ruso.12297 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Ramchand, R., Seelam, R., Parks, V., Ghosh-Dastidar, B., Lee, M. R., & Finucane, M. (2019). Exposure to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Associated Resource Loss, and Long-Term Mental and Behavioral Outcomes. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 1–9. doi:10.1017/dmp.2019.3 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2019.3 title: DOI doi:10.1017/dmp.2019.3 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Petrun Sayers, PhD, E. L., Parker, PhD, A. M., Ramchand, PhD, R., Finucane, PhD, M. L., Parks, MA, V., & Seelam, MPH, R. (2019). Reaching vulnerable populations in the disaster-prone US Gulf Coast: Communicating across the crisis lifecycle. Journal of Emergency Management, 17(4), 271–286. doi:10.5055/jem.2019.0426 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.5055/jem.2019.0426 title: DOI doi:10.5055/jem.2019.0426 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Parker, A. M., Finucane, M. L., Ayer, L., Ramchand, R., Parks, V., & Clancy, N. (2019). Persistent Risk‐Related Worry as a Function of Recalled Exposure to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Prior Trauma. Risk Analysis. doi:10.1111/risa.13437 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/risa.13437 title: DOI doi:10.1111/risa.13437 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Parker, A. M., Edelman, A. F., Carman, K. G., & Finucane, M. L. (2019). On the Need for Prospective Disaster Survey Panels. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 1–3. doi:10.1017/dmp.2019.94 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2019.94 title: DOI doi:10.1017/dmp.2019.94 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Aggregation Info: AggregateInformation: Aggregate Data Set Name: title: Related Publication Citation Citation: Title: Slack, T., Parks, V., Ayer, L., Parker, A. M., Finucane, M. L., & Ramchand, R. (2020). Natech or natural? An analysis of hazard perceptions, institutional trust, and future storm worry following Hurricane Harvey. Natural Hazards. doi:10.1007/s11069-020-03953-6 Date: inapplicable Aggregate Data Set Identifier: title: Related Publication DOI Identifier: Code: Anchor: xlink: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11069-020-03953-6 title: DOI doi:10.1007/s11069-020-03953-6 Association Type: Association type code: crossReference Language: eng; USA Topic category: Topic category code: health Topic category: Topic category code: society Extent: Extent: Description: Dataset contains survey data collected April through August 2016 from Gulf residents residing in 56 counties and parishes in close proximity to the Gulf of Mexico across five states: Louisiana, Texas, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi. Supplemental Information: imputation.csv: Income value (ses2_i, 1-8); Imputation number (imputation); Indicator that SES2 was imputed (imp_ses2, 0=Not imputed or 1=Imputed); Respondent ID number (respid) strong.csv: Column A: Respondent ID number (respid); Column B to H: data from questionnaire survey related to participation in local organizations. For this question set, respondents were asked whether they participated in service and volunteer organizations, recreational groups, political and civic groups, job-­related organizations, religious oriented groups, or other types of organizations (comm1, comm2, comm3, comm4, comm5, comm6, comm7) Column I to Q: data from questionnaire survey related to source of information. For this question set, respondents were asked to select their primary source of information about current events. They were presented with a list of possible sources: television, internet, print (newspapers, magazines), radio, word-of­mouth, or another specified source (sqi1, sqi1_other, trust1, trust2, trust3, trust4, trust5, trust6, trust7) Column R to V: data from questionnaire survey related to employment. For this question set, respondents were asked about employment status. Specifically, they were asked whether they were employed full time or part time, were unemployed and looking for work, were not employed and not looking for work, or were retired or on disability. If respondents reported that they were working full or part time, they were then asked the kind of business or industry in which they work, as well as what kind of work they perform (emp1; imp_emp1, ind1, occup1, emp2) Column W to AF: data from questionnaire survey related to resource networks. For this question set, respondents were asked about whether the people emotionally closest to them (both locally and extra-­locally) could provide them with help and support. Respondents were asked to consider the 20 people most emotionally close to them, and how many of these 20 people lived nearby. Respondents were then asked how many of the emotionally close people residing nearby and those who do not live nearby would be willing to offer support by 1) assisting with payment for essential expenses, 2) providing temporary housing, and 3) providing transportation to medical appointments (locnet1, locnet2, locnet3, locnet4, awaynet1, awaynet2, awaynet3, awaynet1, awaynet2, awaynet3) Column AG to AM: data from questionnaire survey related to financial capability. For this question set, respondents were asked 1) how difficult it is for them to cover their bills and expenses, 2) whether they could cover their expenses for three months in the event of an emergency, and 3) how confident are they in their ability to come up with $2,000 in the event of an unexpected need (fcap1, imp_fcap1, fcap2, imp_fcap2, fcap3, imp_fcap3, fcap4) Column AN to AR: data from questionnaire survey related to risk perceptions. For this question set, respondents were asked 1) How likely was it that the DHOS impacted respondents’ or an immediate family member’s physical health, 2) How dangerous was the DHOS for respondents’ or an immediate family member’s physical health, and 3) How worried were respondents concerning the ongoing impacts of the DHOS on their or an immediate family member’s physical health (prisk1, prisk2, prisk3, prisk4, prisk5) Column AS to BJ: data from questionnaire survey related to oil spill exposure. For this question set, respondents were asked 1) whether anyone in their immediate families was employed in the oil and gas, fishing and seafood, or tourism industries at the time of the DHOS, as well as whether the respondent worked in the oil spill cleanup activities on the shoreline or in the water, 2) whether or not their immediate families had experienced DHOS related effects across several domains: property damage, commercial fishing interruption, disrupted hunting, fishing, and gathering activities, disrupted exercise and recreation patterns, affected dietary or eating patterns, loss of money, job loss or disruption, and the filing of claims for economic damages (emp3, emp4, ind2, occup2, ind3, ind4, ind5, ose1, ose2, ose3a, ose3b, ose4a, ose4b, ose5, ose6, enrg1, job1, claim1) Column BK to BP: data from questionnaire survey related to physical health. For this question set, respondents were asked a series of questions to gauge their perceptions about their current physical health, using measures of general health, health change, and role limitations. To measure general health, respondents were asked to rate their health. To measure health change, they were asked to compare their current physical health with that of one year ago. To measure role limitations, respondents were asked to answer yes or no questions regarding whether or not they had experienced any disruptions to their normal activities (ph1, ph2, ph3, ph4, ph5, ph6) Column BQ to BS: data from questionnaire survey related to alcohol use. For this question set, respondents were asked 1) How often they drink alcohol, 2) How much they drink in a typical day, 3) How often they have more than six drinks on one occasion. The summation of these questions results in a scale indicating potential alcohol misuse (audit1, audit2, audit3) Column BT to CQ: data from questionnaire survey related to trauma. For this question set, respondents were asked about their experiences with various forms of traumatic events they experienced as adults. Those who reported any experiences since age 18 were asked whether the experiences occurred within the preceding 12 months (vict1, vict1a, vict2, vict2a, vict3, vict3a, vict4, vict4a, vict5, vict5a, vict6, vict6a, vict7, vict7a, vict8, vict8a, vict9, vict9a, vict10, vict10a, vict11, vict11a, vict12, vict12a) Column CR to DA: data from questionnaire survey related to mental health. For this question set, respondents were asked few questions to assess three types of mental health conditions. 1) Depression: For this the Patient Health Questionnaire was used to ask whether respondents, in the past two weeks, had “little interest or pleasure in doing things” and if they were “feeling down, depressed, or hopeless.” Respondents are scored based on the prevalence of these symptoms. 2) Anxiety: For this the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire was used to ask whether respondents, in the past two weeks, had been “feeling nervous, anxious, or on edge,” or whether they had experienced “not being able to stop or control worrying.” Respondents are scored based on the prevalence of these symptoms. 3) Illness anxiety: For this respondents were asked the frequency with which they had experienced six different symptoms associated with illness anxiety (phq1, phq2, gad1, gad2, w1, w2, w3, w4, w5, w6) Column DB to DJ: data from questionnaire survey related to health care utilization health. For this question set, respondents were asked a series of questions about their health care coverage and use of health services. First, respondents were asked whether they have any kind of health care coverage. Then, they were asked whether there is a particular health care office they can visit when they are sick or need advice. If they said no, they were asked why. Next, respondents were asked how many different visits they made to an emergency room or urgent care facility or whether they had visited mental health professionals in the past 12 months (hutil1, imp_hutil1, hutil2, hutil3a, hutil3b, hutil3c, hutil3d, hutil3e, hutil3f, hutil1, imp_hutil1, hutil2, hutil3a, hutil3b, hutil3c, hutil3d, hutil3e, hutil3f) Column DK to EQ: data from questionnaire survey related to demographics. For this question set, respondents were asked a series of demographic questions to further understand resilient populations. Respondents were asked about their 1) core demographics like age, ethnicity, race, educational attainment, 2) household characteristics, 3) sexual identity, 4)military and veteran status, and 5) religiosity (gendr, imp_gndr, age, imp_age, hispanic, imp_hispanic, ethnica, ethnica_other, white, black, aian, asian, pacific, imp_race, race1a, race1a_other, race1b, race1b_other, race1c, race1c_other, race1d, race1d_other, race2, marital, imp_marital, child1, child2, ses1, imp_ses1, ses2, sor1, rel1, vet1) Column ER: dwr (Respondent was resident of the region at time of Deepwater Horizon, here 0=No, 1=Yes) Column ES: Weight_post_total (Weight for full sample) codebook.txt: code book contains information about the survey questionnaire, variable descriptions, and code values used in the data files|Data were collected via telephone interviews conducted from April 22 to August 6, 2016. The sample is a randomly selected, representative group of adults residing in 56 counties and parishes in close proximity to the Gulf of Mexico across five states. The total sample includes a traditional landline telephone sample of 1,617 respondents and a cell phone sample of 903 respondents, resulting in a combined sample size of 2,520 respondents. Several sociodemographic variables (employment status, financial capability, health care coverage, gender, age, Hispanic status, race, marital status, and education) were singly imputed. Income had more missing cases, and was multiply imputed. Weights are included to improve the representativeness of the sample to the regional population profile. A base weight was calculated based upon probability of selection. This base weight was then adjusted based on several population parameters (age, race, Hispanic, education, household income, gender) using benchmark values from the 2012-2016 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) estimates.||||
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Distribution info: Distribution: Distributor: Distributor: Distributor contact: Responsible party: Organisation name: Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) Contact info: Contact: Phone: Telephone: Voice: 3618253604 Address: Address: Delivery point: 6300 Ocean Drive City: Corpus Christi Administrative area: TX Postal code: 78412 Country: USA Electronic mail address: griidc@gomri.org Online Resource: Online Resource: Linkage: URL: https://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org Role: Role code: distributor Distributor format: Format: Name: csv, txt Version: inapplicable File decompression technique: zip Distributor transfer options: Digital transfer options: Transfer size: 0.2813 Online: Online Resource: Linkage: URL: https://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org/data/R4.x266.199:0001 Protocol: https Name: Data Landing Page Description: GRIIDC dataset landing page Function: Online function code: information
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Metadata maintenance: Maintenance information: Maintenance and update frequency: unknown Maintenance note: This ISO metadata record was automatically generated from information provided to GRIIDC for dataset: R4.x266.199:0001 on 2020-09-24T11:18:49-05:00
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Publications:

Ayer, L., Engel, C., Parker, A., Seelam, R., & Ramchand, R. (2018). Behavioral Health of Gulf Coast Residents 6 Years After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: The Role of Trauma History. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 1–7. doi:10.1017/dmp.2018.84

Drakeford, L., Parks, V., Slack, T., Ramchand, R., Finucane, M., & Lee, M. R. (2019). Oil Spill Disruption and Problem Drinking: Assessing the Impact of Religious Context among Gulf Coast Residents. Population Research and Policy Review. doi:10.1007/s11113-019-09520-7

Parks, V., Slack, T., Ramchand, R., Drakeford, L., Finucane, M. L., & Lee, M. R. (2019). Fishing Households, Social Support, and Depression after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. Rural Sociology. doi:10.1111/ruso.12297

Ramchand, R., Seelam, R., Parks, V., Ghosh-Dastidar, B., Lee, M. R., & Finucane, M. (2019). Exposure to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Associated Resource Loss, and Long-Term Mental and Behavioral Outcomes. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 1–9. doi:10.1017/dmp.2019.3

Petrun Sayers, PhD, E. L., Parker, PhD, A. M., Ramchand, PhD, R., Finucane, PhD, M. L., Parks, MA, V., & Seelam, MPH, R. (2019). Reaching vulnerable populations in the disaster-prone US Gulf Coast: Communicating across the crisis lifecycle. Journal of Emergency Management, 17(4), 271–286. doi:10.5055/jem.2019.0426

Parker, A. M., Finucane, M. L., Ayer, L., Ramchand, R., Parks, V., & Clancy, N. (2019). Persistent Risk‐Related Worry as a Function of Recalled Exposure to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Prior Trauma. Risk Analysis. doi:10.1111/risa.13437

Parker, A. M., Edelman, A. F., Carman, K. G., & Finucane, M. L. (2019). On the Need for Prospective Disaster Survey Panels. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 1–3. doi:10.1017/dmp.2019.94

Slack, T., Parks, V., Ayer, L., Parker, A. M., Finucane, M. L., & Ramchand, R. (2020). Natech or natural? An analysis of hazard perceptions, institutional trust, and future storm worry following Hurricane Harvey. Natural Hazards. doi:10.1007/s11069-020-03953-6

Dataset Links: