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Lagrangian particle tracker with random walk diffusion simulation: Oil concentration of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from June 21 to July 11, 2010

Integrated Assessment of Oil Spill

DOI:
10.7266/N76H4FDQ
 
UDI:
Y1.x024.009:0001
Last Update:
May 27 2014 22:10 UTC
 
Dataset Author(s):
Fitzpatrick, Patrick, and Yee Lau
Point of Contact:
Fitzpatrick, Patrick
Mississippi State University / Geosystems Research Institute
1021 Balch Blvd
Stennis Space Center, Mississippi  39529
USA
fitz@gri.msstate.edu
Funding Source:
The Northern Gulf Institute (NGI)
Data Collection Period:
2010-06-21 to 2010-07-11

Identified Submitted Metadata Available
3 3 3 3

Abstract:

The simulation is based on a Lagrangian particle tracker with random walk diffusion model. Input consists of latitude and longitude positions of parcels in the oil contaminated area, wind, current, and a large array of random numbers. In addition, new parcels are released at the location of the damaged Macondo rig. Twenty-five parcels are released at each position, and when combined with the diffusion coefficient (set to 10m2/s) results in a natural spread of the parcels with time. The parcel location is based on NASA MODIS satellite imagery, SAR imagery and NOAA oil trajectory maps. The parcels are advected at 80% of the ocean current speed and at 3% of the wind speed. Bilinear interpolation is applied at each timestep to determine the currents and winds at each parcel position. The pseudo-random numbers are uniformly distributed between 0 and 1 and generated by the efficient Mersenne Twister algorithm. The 10-m wind and near-surface ocean currents are provided from an operational, data assimilating forecast system run by the Naval Oceanographic Office called the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) in the Intra-Americas Sea domain which covers the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, interpolated to a 3-km Cartesian grid. NCOM assimilates water temperature, salinity analyses, and satellite altimeter data, and the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS) provides the atmospheric forcing. An examination of NCOM data and the oil spill simulation, as well as in-situ data from buoys, weather reanalysis maps, tide gauge data, scatterometer data, and HF radar show that two weather systems altered the currents and water levels such that oil was pushed into the western Mississippi Sound and the Rigolets. An easterly wind fetch from intensifying Hurricane Alex provided the first inland push, followed by a westward-drifting non-tropical low which had formed off the western edge of a Gulf cold front. In both cases, a generally weak pressure gradient was replaced by strong easterly winds which not only switched westerly coastal currents to an easterly direction, but also increased inland water levels by 0.6-0.8 m. These results show that cyclones located west of the oil spill can dramatically alter oil transport. Use constraints: We request that you acknowledge the Northern Gulf Institute as the source of this information. Mississippi State University makes no warranty regarding these data, expressed or implied, nor does the distribution constitute such a warranty. Mississippi State University can not assume liability for any damages caused by any errors or omissions in these data, nor as a result of the failure of these data to function on a particular system.

Purpose:

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted the Mississippi River Delta, Barataria Bay, the barrier islands east of Louisiana, and the Alabama and Florida coast for an extended period of time from May through July. However, the Rigolets and western Mississippi coast were impacted for a briefer period from late June to early July. An important component to understanding the oil transport is to distinguish the influences behind this apex moment. A simulation was conducted for the period June 21 to July 11, 2010 to understand this inland transport.

Theme Keywords:

inland transport, Lagrangian particle tracker, BP oil spill, Macondo Rig, random walk diffusion, oil spill simulation, surface oil dispersion

File Format:

wmv, txt

Lagrangian particle tracker with random walk diffusion simulation: Oil concentration of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from June 21 to July 11, 2010



Identification Information
Distribution Information

Metadata: 
  File identifier: 
      Y1.x024.009-0001-metadata.xml
  Language: 
      eng; USA
  Character set: 
    Character set code: 
      utf8
  Hierarchy level: 
    Scope code: 
      dataset
  Metadata author: 
    Responsible party: 
      Individual name: 
          Patrick Fitzpatrick
      Organisation name: 
          Mississippi State University / Science and Technology Center
      Position name: 
          Associate Research Professor
      Contact info: 
        Contact: 
          Phone: 
            Telephone: 
              Voice: 
                  1 228-688-1157
              Facsimile: 
                  1 228-688-7100
          Address: 
            Address: 
              Delivery point: 
                  1021 Balch Boulevard
              City: 
                  Stennis Space Center
              Administrative area: 
                  Mississippi
              Postal code: 
                  39529
              Country: 
                  USA
              Electronic mail address: 
                  fitz@gri.msstate.edu
      Role: 
        Role code: 
          pointOfContact
  Date stamp: 
      2017-02-14T22:38:59+00:00
  Metadata standard name: 
      ISO 19115-2 Geographic Information - Metadata - Part 2: Extensions for Imagery and Gridded Data
  Metadata standard version: 
      ISO 19115-2:2009(E)
  Dataset URI: 
      https://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org/metadata/Y1.x024.009:0001
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Identification info: Data identification: Citation: Citation: Title: Lagrangian particle tracker with random walk diffusion simulation: Oil concentration of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from June 21 to July 11, 2010 Alternate title: Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Simulation from June 21 to July 11, 2010, Northern Gulf Institute, MSU, MS Date: Date: Date: 2014-06-09 Date type: Date type code: publication Abstract: The simulation is based on a Lagrangian particle tracker with random walk diffusion model. Input consists of latitude and longitude positions of parcels in the oil contaminated area, wind, current, and a large array of random numbers. In addition, new parcels are released at the location of the damaged Macondo rig. Twenty-five parcels are released at each position, and when combined with the diffusion coefficient (set to 10m2/s) results in a natural spread of the parcels with time. The parcel location is based on NASA MODIS satellite imagery, SAR imagery and NOAA oil trajectory maps. The parcels are advected at 80% of the ocean current speed and at 3% of the wind speed. Bilinear interpolation is applied at each timestep to determine the currents and winds at each parcel position. The pseudo-random numbers are uniformly distributed between 0 and 1 and generated by the efficient Mersenne Twister algorithm. The 10-m wind and near-surface ocean currents are provided from an operational, data assimilating forecast system run by the Naval Oceanographic Office called the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) in the Intra-Americas Sea domain which covers the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, interpolated to a 3-km Cartesian grid. NCOM assimilates water temperature, salinity analyses, and satellite altimeter data, and the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS) provides the atmospheric forcing. An examination of NCOM data and the oil spill simulation, as well as in-situ data from buoys, weather reanalysis maps, tide gauge data, scatterometer data, and HF radar show that two weather systems altered the currents and water levels such that oil was pushed into the western Mississippi Sound and the Rigolets. An easterly wind fetch from intensifying Hurricane Alex provided the first inland push, followed by a westward-drifting non-tropical low which had formed off the western edge of a Gulf cold front. In both cases, a generally weak pressure gradient was replaced by strong easterly winds which not only switched westerly coastal currents to an easterly direction, but also increased inland water levels by 0.6-0.8 m. These results show that cyclones located west of the oil spill can dramatically alter oil transport. Use constraints: We request that you acknowledge the Northern Gulf Institute as the source of this information. Mississippi State University makes no warranty regarding these data, expressed or implied, nor does the distribution constitute such a warranty. Mississippi State University can not assume liability for any damages caused by any errors or omissions in these data, nor as a result of the failure of these data to function on a particular system. Purpose: The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted the Mississippi River Delta, Barataria Bay, the barrier islands east of Louisiana, and the Alabama and Florida coast for an extended period of time from May through July. However, the Rigolets and western Mississippi coast were impacted for a briefer period from late June to early July. An important component to understanding the oil transport is to distinguish the influences behind this apex moment. A simulation was conducted for the period June 21 to July 11, 2010 to understand this inland transport. Status: Progress code: completed Point of contact: Responsible party: Individual name: Patrick Fitzpatrick Organisation name: Mississippi State University / Science and Technology Center Position name: Associate Research Professor Contact info: Contact: Phone: Telephone: Voice: 1 228-688-1157 Facsimile: 1 228-688-7100 Address: Address: Delivery point: 1021 Balch Boulevard City: Stennis Space Center Administrative area: Mississippi Postal code: 39529 Country: USA Electronic mail address: fitz@gri.msstate.edu Role: Role code: pointOfContact Descriptive keywords: Keywords: Keyword: inland transport Keyword: Lagrangian particle tracker Keyword: BP oil spill Keyword: Macondo Rig Keyword: random walk diffusion Keyword: oil spill simulation Keyword: surface oil dispersion Type: Keyword type code: theme Descriptive keywords: Keywords: Keyword: Rigolets Keyword: western Mississippi coast Keyword: Mississippi River Delta Keyword: Barataria Bay Keyword: barrier islands Keyword: Louisiana coast Keyword: Alabama coast Keyword: Florida coast Type: Keyword type code: place Language: eng;USA Topic category: Topic category code: oceans Topic category: Topic category code: environment Extent: Extent: Geographic element: Geographic bounding box: West bound longitude: -92 East bound longitude: -85 South bound latitude: 26 North bound latitude: 31 Geographic element: BoundingPolygon: Polygon: Polygon: Outer boundary: Linear ring: Coordinates: 31,-92 31,-85 26,-85 26,-92 31,-92 Temporal element: Temporal extent: Extent: Time period: Description: modeled period Begin date: 2010-06-21 End date: 2010-07-11 Supplemental Information: wmv movie of oil concentration in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. txt files with latitude (decimal degrees), longitude (decimal degrees), oil concentration in the water (percentage with values from 0 to 1). The simulation is based on a Lagrangian particle tracker with random walk diffusion model. Input consists of latitude and longitude positions of parcels in the oil contaminated area, wind, current, and a large array of random numbers. In addition, new parcels are released at the location of the damaged Macondo rig. Twenty-five parcels are released at each position, and when combined with the diffusion coefficient (set to 10m2/s) results in a natural spread of the parcels with time. The parcel location is based on NASA MODIS satellite imagery, SAR imagery and NOAA oil trajectory maps. The parcels are advected at 80% of the ocean current speed and at 3% of the wind speed. Bilinear interpolation is applied at each timestep to determine the currents and winds at each parcel position. The pseudo-random numbers are uniformly distributed between 0 and 1 and generated by the efficient Mersenne Twister algorithm. The 10-m wind and near-surface ocean currents are provided from an operational, data assimilating forecast system run by the Naval Oceanographic Office called the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) in the Intra-Americas Sea domain which covers the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, interpolated to a 3-km Cartesian grid. NCOM assimilates water temperature, salinity analyses, and satellite altimeter data, and the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS) provides the atmospheric forcing. An examination of NCOM data and the oil spill simulation, as well as in-situ data from buoys, weather reanalysis maps, tide gauge data, scatterometer data, and HF radar show that two weather systems altered the currents and water levels such that oil was pushed into the western Mississippi Sound and the Rigolets. An easterly wind fetch from intensifying Hurricane Alex provided the first inland push, followed by a westward-drifting non-tropical low which had formed off the western edge of a Gulf cold front. In both cases, a generally weak pressure gradient was replaced by strong easterly winds which not only switched westerly coastal currents to an easterly direction, but also increased inland water levels by 0.6-0.8 m. These results show that cyclones located west of the oil spill can dramatically alter oil transport. NASA MODIS satellite imagery, SAR imagery from http://www.cstars.miami.edu (login now required, contact University of Miami for detail) ; Archived NOAA oil trajectory maps at http://www.noaa.gov/deepwaterhorizon/maps/index.html ; Current and archived NCOM AMSEAS data from http://edac-dap3.northerngulfinstitute.org/thredds/catalog/AmSeas/catalog.html|||||
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Distribution info: Distribution: Distributor: Distributor: Distributor contact: Responsible party: Organisation name: Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) Contact info: Contact: Phone: Telephone: Voice: +1-361-825-3604 Facsimile: +1-361-825-2050 Address: Address: Delivery point: 6300 Ocean Drive Unit 5869 City: Corpus Christi Administrative area: Texas Postal code: 78412-5869 Country: USA Electronic mail address: griidc@gomri.org Online Resource: Online Resource: Linkage: URL: http://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org Protocol: Role: Role code: distributor Distributor format: Format: Name: wmv, txt Version: File decompression technique: tar, gz Distributor transfer options: Digital transfer options: Transfer size: 7.125 Online: Online Resource: Linkage: URL: http://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org/data/Y1.x024.009:0001 Protocol: http
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